PNG to JPEG

Convert PNG to JPEG (Fast & Free)

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How to convert PNG to JPEG ?

  1. Select PNG files you want to convert, from your computer or drag and drop it on the page.
  2. Press the "Convert" button in order to convert PNG to JPEG.
  3. When the conversion is completed, click "Download" on the desired converted JPEG file.

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PNG to JPEG

Useful information about PNG

Extension: PNG
Name: Portable Network Graphics
Mime Type: image/png
Converter: PNG Converter
Description: Portable Network Graphics (PNG) is a raster-graphics file format that supports lossless data compression. PNG was developed as an improved, non-patented replacement for Graphics Interchange Format (GIF) — unofficially, the initials PNG stood for the recursive acronym 'PNG's not GIF'.
PNG supports palette-based images (with palettes of 24-bit RGB or 32-bit RGBA colors), grayscale images (with or without an alpha channel for transparency), and full-color non-palette-based RGB or RGBA images. The PNG working group designed the format for transferring images on the Internet, not for professional-quality print graphics; therefore non-RGB color spaces such as CMYK are not supported. A PNG file contains a single image in an extensible structure of chunks, encoding the basic pixels and other information such as textual comments and integrity checks documented in RFC 2083.
PNG files use the file extension PNG or png and are assigned MIME media type image/png. PNG was published as informational RFC 2083 in March 1997 and as an ISO/IEC 15948 standard in 2004. - Source

Useful information about JPEG

Extension: JPEG
Name: Joint Photographic Experts Group
Mime Type: image/jpeg
Converter: JPEG Converter
Description: JPEG is a commonly used method of lossy compression for digital images, particularly for those images produced by digital photography. The degree of compression can be adjusted, allowing a selectable tradeoff between storage size and image quality. JPEG typically achieves 10:1 compression with little perceptible loss in image quality. Since its introduction in 1992, JPEG has been the most widely used image compression standard in the world, and the most widely used digital image format, with several billion JPEG images produced every day as of 2015.
The term 'JPEG' is an acronym for the Joint Photographic Experts Group, which created the standard in 1992. JPEG was largely responsible for the proliferation of digital images and digital photos across the Internet, and later social media.
JPEG compression is used in a number of image file formats. JPEG/Exif is the most common image format used by digital cameras and other photographic image capture devices; along with JPEG/JFIF, it is the most common format for storing and transmitting photographic images on the World Wide Web. These format variations are often not distinguished, and are simply called JPEG.
The MIME media type for JPEG is image/jpeg, except in older Internet Explorer versions, which provides a MIME type of image/pjpeg when uploading JPEG images. JPEG files usually have a filename extension of .jpg or .jpeg. JPEG/JFIF supports a maximum image size of 65,535×65,535 pixels, hence up to 4 gigapixels for an aspect ratio of 1:1. In 2000, the JPEG group introduced a format intended to be a successor, JPEG 2000, but it was unable to replace the original JPEG as the dominant image standard. - Source